peach and raspberry pie

Peach Melba Galette

peach melba galette

Doing what I do for my business has its benefits: I get to play and experiment with food and there is nearly always something tasty to eat, however it also has its downsides. It is thoroughly shocking for the waistline. Our new neighbours are going to love us when I appear on their doorsteps next week with freshly baked recipe tested goods.

Peach Melba Galette is a recipe I’ve developed for my primary school cookery club. Like I’ve mentioned before we have quite a few restrictions:

  • 10x 6-11 year olds (a child’s fine motor skills can dramatically differ in just the space of a few years)
  • Each child must make a full thing. Not take one carefully decorated biscuit home that’s been made with the rest of the group.
  • No fancy ingredients or equipment – we want them to make it again at home.
  • 90 min to make, bake and wash up.
  • £1 budget a head
  • Has to fit on a baking tray not much bigger than an A4 piece of paper.
  • Over the term use different skills and techniques. In other words there are only so many things you can learn by making fruit salad.
  • Only catering ovens and microwave available. No Hob.

Sometimes it just means getting a bit creative with a recipe. For the autumn term I decided I wanted to do some sort of pie with my pupils. Pastry is a good lesson in perseverance, fine motor skills and something that many of my new 6yo pupils may not have made. The skills in pastry making also link to other things we’ll be making later in the year.

A Galette is essentially a free-form pie with no upper crust, though purists will say it should be made with flaky pastry. The first version of this pie was made with jam tart pastry, but it wasn’t quite sweet enough so swapped for the pastry I use in my apricot and almond tart. This meant we had to taste test the galette twice, what a shame.

peach and raspberry pie

I have a bit of a weakness for tinned peaches (along with tinned pears) and some people are surprised that tinned fruit & vegetable still counts as one of your 5-a-day. But then it also shocks me how many people, especially ones who claim to be foodies, are still clueless about basic preservation techniques that have stood the test of time (that’s for another blog post). Yes some may argue that tinned and frozen is not quite a good as the fresh version, but it is still better than a chocolate bar and when that fruit is out of season it can work out significantly cheaper.

Some of the children who come to my classes get free school meals and their cookery club places are funded by school. I think it is really important to to show the children different ways they can access fruit and vegetables even more so when the food budget at home is tight.

When we do this galette in class we will be using tinned pears and frozen raspberries.

Peach Melba Galette
Serves 1-4 depending on how big your pudding stomach is

  • 60g plain flour
  • 35g salted butter, chilled and cubed
  • 10g caster sugar
  • 2 teaspoons of raspberry jam
  • 80g sliced tinned peaches (works out at about 1 peach worth)
  • 5 raspberries

 

  1. In a bowl rub together the butter and flour until it is the consistency of breadcrumbs. Stir in the sugar.
  2. Add cold water a teaspoon at a time and mix until you have a soft dough. Knead for a couple of seconds to help the dough combine.
  3. On a lightly floured surface roll out the pastry until it is about 20 cm across.
  4. Spread the jam over the centre of the dough leaving a border of around 2cm on the outside of the pastry.
  5. Lay your sliced peaches on top of the jam then top with the raspberries.
  6. Crimp the edges of the pastry to give your pie a crust.
  7. Bake at 180°c for 20-25 minutes. Eat hot or cold.

Post Author: Jules

Freelance food geek who's passionate about food education.

7 thoughts on “Peach Melba Galette

    trixpin

    (August 16, 2013 - 11:23 pm)

    Wow, the guidelines you have to follow for the school cookery club are TOUGH. It must be hard to stick to them the whole time …
    I agree with you about tinned peaches. I found that when I poached my own, and carefully peeled and stoned them, they tasted like … guess what? Tinned peaches! I hate tinned peas – all yellow and mushy, but then that’s what the frozen ones are for ;)
    Lovely looking dish!

      Jules

      (August 17, 2013 - 5:02 am)

      Ah a fellow tinned peach fan. I love fresh peaches too but I often find they can be disappointingly dry or tasteless. At least with tinned they are always juicy.

      I do like tinned marrowfat peas and mushy peas but you’re right, normal peas are just weird tinned.

        trixpin

        (August 17, 2013 - 11:34 pm)

        Oh, I LOVE marrowfat peas. Oh no, I’m craving them now …

    Domestic Executive (@domesticexec)

    (August 17, 2013 - 12:01 am)

    Great post Jules so see all the detailed thinking behind the cooking classes. Even if it does mean the waistline takes a strain :o)

      Jules

      (August 17, 2013 - 5:09 am)

      Next week I’m planning 10 weeks of evening classes for adults. That’s going to be a killer!

    Christine

    (August 20, 2013 - 12:34 pm)

    Have been following your blog for a while, and finally got round to making a recipe (or my kids did). We loved this, very tasty and easy to make. The pastry sides collapsed but the kids didn’t notice and they’ve wolfed them down for lunch. Thanks!

      Jules

      (August 20, 2013 - 12:39 pm)

      Christine. So pleased you’ve made a recipe and it went down well.

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