Simple Strawberry Ice Cream

Sometimes the best things in life are the simplest. Warm fresh bread with butter, cheese on toast or strawberries and cream. Nothing fancy, just two great ingredients paired perfectly.

Although I have an ice cream maker attachment for my KitchenAid I’ve always been put off making ice cream 1) because I’m not the biggest ice cream fan 2) so many ice cream recipes seem to be a big fat faff. Going on the Historic Ices course last week made me realise that ice cream doesn’t need to be complicated or involve eggs.

Initially I wanted to try this recipe with raspberries, but with 1kg of strawberries on the turn and unsuitable for one of the classes I was running, this was a perfect opportunity to give the strawberry ice cream recipe I made on the course another go.

Whipping cream is the best cream to use for ice cream making due to its fat content being higher than single cream, but less than double. The amount of sugar used will also alter how well the ice cream freezes. The higher the sugar content, the softer the ice cream will be with less ice crystals.  If you taste the mixture before freezing you’ll notice it is quite sweet, but when foods are chilled they lose their sweetness so you have to over compensate when it is not frozen. If an ice cream is sickly sweet when it’s frozen, just imagine how much sugar has gone in to it at the beginning. The lemon in the recipe is essential for cutting through the richness. You don’t taste it as such, it just works.

This is a rich ice cream and I can only eat a few spoonfuls of it at a time, but the taste oh the taste. Forget over-sweet, fake-flavoured commercially available ice cream you can eat by the gallon. This is the real, intense flavours of fresh strawberries. 1kg strawberries made 2 litres of ice cream and for one of the litres I boiled down some of the leftover strawberries to make a strawberry coulis that was swirled through the ice cream.  I’m thinking in a future batch swirling in a few shortbread pieces to give the ice cream some texture.

Of course the freezing method for this ice cream will depend on the type of ice cream maker you have, below is the method I use in my KitchenAid Ice cream attachment. Could even use the freezer bag method to make a small portion of this ice cream. This recipe also measures the fruit in volume which makes it easier to scale up and down.

 

Simple Strawberry Ice Cream
Makes 1 litre 

500ml (approx 400g) strawberries

500ml whipping cream

200g caster sugar

juice of one lemon

 

1) Put all the ingredients in a blender then blend until smooth.

2) Pass the mixture through a fine sieve to get rid of the seeds.

3) Pour the mixture into the ice cream maker and churn for 10-15 minutes until it has begun to thicken and reaches soft scoop stage. To be honest it is delicious just like this.

4) Decant the ice cream in to a tub and freeze for 3-4 hours until firm.

Post Author: Jules

Freelance food geek who's passionate about food education.

6 thoughts on “Simple Strawberry Ice Cream

    thelittleloaf

    (August 28, 2012 - 9:31 am)

    I absolutely agree, sometimes simple is best! Especially when it’s gorgeous flavours like strawberries and cream.

      Jules

      (August 28, 2012 - 9:45 am)

      I can’t wait to try it with raspberries, because I adore them.

    Jayne

    (August 28, 2012 - 9:32 am)

    This sounds wonderful! I love ice cream but was put off buying the kitchen aid attachment, I wasn’t sure how well it would work. Seeing your ice cream, I am impressed!

      Jules

      (August 28, 2012 - 9:48 am)

      Although we don’t use the attachment as much as we should, but when I do use it it works well. The bowl just lives in the freezer.

    Charlotte - Charlotte's Kitchen Diary

    (August 31, 2012 - 6:44 pm)

    This looks gorgeous, Jules. I must get my hands on the ice cream attachment for me KA!

    […] Strawberry Mille Feuille recipe by Stephen Crane  recipe at home. Any excuse for me to get out the ice cream maker again. This dessert is elegant (if you ignore my rushed quenelle!) and surprisingly easy to construct. […]

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