Fresh from the oven – White Tin Loaf

Since baking my own bread I can’t remember the last time I bought a sliced loaf. As much as I love all the artisan style bread I bake, sometimes only a traditional white tin loaf will do and shop-bought bread certainly doesn’t cut the mustard for me any more. When I found out that this months Fresh from the Oven‘s host was going to be Linda from With Knife & Fork and she had chosen White Tin Loaf I was really pleased.

This recipe uses a different kneading method to what I’m used to and sometimes the urge to whack all the ingredients into the KitchenAid can be to much, but this time I stuck with it and was genuinely impressed with the results. When I initially read the kneading instructions I could see how it could work, but I was proven wrong.

It produced a loaf with amazing oven spring and the perfect texture and size for bacon cobs. Although it doesn’t have the strong taste like some of my bread does this makes it great for simple sandwiches. Everyone once in a while wants a basic, comforting sarnie be the filling ham and pickle or cheese and tomato. Don’t be put off by the long looking method. It is truly worth it.

The 1 tip I would give would be that 10 min before the end of baking turn the loaf upside down in the tin. This helps the bottom of the loaf to crusten up.

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Dan Lepard says he developed this when he was working full time in commercial kitchens (that made artisan hand kneaded bread) because there wasn’t time for full 10 minute knead of all the different bread batches so he switched to short kneads spaced out and found it works just as well, part of the development of a good gluten structure is dependent on the time elapsed not the vigorous kneading. I liked the idea because I’d not been getting good textures with either a machine or a normal hand knead. I am now a wholesale convert.

Note:

You must use oil not flour on the kneading surface and your hands. Something like vegetable oil is good.

The dough must be quite sticky and soft to start with. It will firm up when kneaded and as time progresses.

Steps:

* Once you have soft sticky dough leave it covered in the bowl for 10 minutes.
* Now oil your kneading surface and hands and tip the dough out.
* Knead for about 12 seconds by folding in the edges to the centre, a bit like shaping a round loaf, rotate the dough as you go.
* Flip the dough over, leave it on the surface and cover with a cloth. Wash out the bowl and then oil it lightly. Put the dough back in the bowl and cover.
* Leave for 10-15 minutes and then do another 12 second knead. You will notice the dough is already less sticky and firmer.
* Leave for 20 -30 mins and repeat the fast knead. You are aiming to have kneaded the dough 3 times in the first hour.
* Leave covered to rise until at least 50% larger but not more than double in size.
* Tip out onto the oil surface and press the air out of the dough using the tips of your fingers so its square-ish in shape. Repeat the fast knead process (or fold in to thirds then rotate through 90, flatten again and fold into 3rds again).
* Shape the dough as required for the particular loaf you are making. Put it in a tin, or supported in a floured cloth in a bowl.
* Leave to rise until at least 50% larger and preferably almost double in size.
* Slash top and bake as per your recipe.

White Tin Loaf (based on Dan Lepard’s Quick White Loaf, p63 of the Handmade Loaf)

2lb loaf tin greased and floured or lined with baking parchment (no need to line the short ends just oil them).

Oven to be pre-heated to its maximum setting (R10/250C) and with a tray of water in the bottom to create steam.

Ingredients:

200g semi skimmed milk at room temp (Dan uses whole milk but semi skimmed seems to work fine)

150g water at room temp (remember 1g = 1ml but its easier to be accurate weighing fluids)

1 tsp fast action yeast (or 2 tsp fresh yeast crumbled)

200g plain white flour

300g strong white bread flour

1 ½ tsp fine sea salt

Method:

Mix the flours and salt together in a bowl.

Mix the water and milk together in a separate bowl and whisk in the yeast.

Add the liquid to the flour and mix with the fingers of one hand to a soft sticky rough dough. You may need to add a little more liquid do this a teaspoon at a time until you have a soft sticky dough.

Follow the kneading instructions above.

The first rise will probably take about an hour from the last knead.

To shape for a tin loaf, flatten the dough to a square about the same width as your tin. Roll the dough into a cylinder and press the seam firmly, fold under the two short ends and place in the tin seam side down.

Allow to rise (covered) to 1 ½ to 2 times volume i.e. to the top of the tin.

Slash the top of the loaf along it length and put it straight into the oven for 10 minutes at maximum temperature. After 10 minutes check how it’s browning and drop the temperature as follows (these baking guidelines are from the River Cottage Bread Book):

R6/200C if the crust is pale

R4/180C if crust is noticeably browning

R3/170C if crust is browning quickly

And cook for a further 40-50 minutes.

I usually check again part way through this time and either adjust temperature again or cover the top with foil if it’s brown enough. Also note that with a traditional gas oven (i.e. one without a fan) the top may brown far too quickly on the side near the heat at the initial temperature so you might want to start at a lower setting of R8/9 for the first 10 minutes. Adapt the setting for what you know about your oven and how things usually bake.

When it’s cooked turn it out of the tin and allow to cool.

Post Author: Jules

Freelance food geek who's passionate about food education.

15 thoughts on “Fresh from the oven – White Tin Loaf

    Jennifer

    (November 28, 2009 - 4:52 am)

    That looks really good. I agree that nothing beats homemade bread and sometimes a white loaf is just what you need. Thanks for sharing the recipe and tips with us.

    things we make

    (November 28, 2009 - 8:47 am)

    Hi Jules. This looks really similar to my loaf other than your proper deep cut in the top look better! Lovely texture wasn't it? On to the next…

    mamajac

    (November 28, 2009 - 10:42 am)

    Nice loaf, I liked it, too!

    James

    (November 28, 2009 - 3:02 pm)

    Looks like a cracking loaf to make sandwiches with!

    goodshoeday

    (November 28, 2009 - 3:28 pm)

    I really must go and buy a grignette to slash the tops of my loaves with. Glad you enjoyed the challenge. I mostly make sourdough for me and variants of this loaf for my husband as he isn't addicted to sourdough like I am. And it does make a really nice change too.

    Claire

    (November 29, 2009 - 7:50 pm)

    That looks lovely Jules :)

    Sarah, Maison Cupcake

    (November 29, 2009 - 11:37 pm)

    First the bread bowls, now proper loaves, it's all dawning on me that there's a group of you making yeasty stuff! Only discovered Fresh from the Oven today, it all looks great. Not made much bread myself so I ought to give it a try.

    The Caked Crusader

    (November 30, 2009 - 8:47 am)

    what a stunning looking loaf – you've made a great job of it; it's the perfect blend of professional and rustic. I'd like a slice please with thick butter!

    The Curious Cat

    (November 30, 2009 - 10:41 am)

    Sounds lush but some work! Would kill for a nice buttered slice right now! When you turn it upside down for ten mins, you don't mean, turn it upside down in the tin do you? Or do you just turn the whole thing upside down, tin and all on a tray? xxx

    Claire

    (November 30, 2009 - 1:55 pm)

    Your crust looks fantastic. Looking forward to tomorrows challenge!

    Springtime

    (November 30, 2009 - 8:48 pm)

    Looks amazing, I'm imagining a bacon sandwich made this bread and my mouth is watering just at the thought!

    Cottage Garden

    (December 4, 2009 - 11:26 pm)

    Hi JulesIt's good to hear from you and its been way too long since I popped over here. I'm inspired now to make my own bread – New Year's resolution perhaps?Have a good weekend. Jeanne

    Rhyleysgranny

    (December 11, 2009 - 8:14 am)

    Like you I make all my own bread. So much nicer. Your loaf looks lovely. I haven’t used the combo of bread and plain flour before in a loaf though it makes very soft rolls. Have you ever used the River Cottage bread book? It’s a great book. Daniel Stevens makes it all so simple you wonder why you didn’t think of it before. Your new blog is lovely. :)

    […] Sandwiches served on homemade white bread with various fillings: Egg & Cress Smoked Salmon & Cream Cheese Beef & Horseradish […]

    Jules: Butcher Baker (@DomesticJules)

    (February 15, 2014 - 3:29 pm)

    @missstephwalker this is a good sandwich loaf recipe http://t.co/fIOEVyz3cx

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